The Golden Platform

A FOCUS ON THE FORCES CHANGING OUR WORLD

Posts tagged Monsanto

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Franken-wheat

I’ve been wondering about that Monsanto Protection Act…

…does it have anything to do with their illegal GMO wheat that was found growing in an Oregon field earlier this year? 

Although I realize there are active investigations and lawsuits in regards to that - I’m beginning to wonder if Monsanto intentionally lobbied for their (dubbed) “Monsanto Protection Act” knowing full well that their wheat had been planted illegally.

As the Huffington Post states:


"Monsanto Co’s unapproved, experimental genetically engineered wheat, which is feared to have potentially contaminated U.S. wheat supplies after it was found growing in an Oregon field this spring, was kept in a U.S. government storage facility until at least late 2011, according to documents obtained by Reuters.

The revelation that the seed for the controversial genetically engineered wheat was kept viable in a Colorado storage facility as recently as a year and a half ago comes as the U.S. government is investigating how the strain of experimental wheat wound up growing in an Oregon field this spring. 

(Source:
Monsanto’s Unapproved GMO Wheat Stored In Colorado For 7 Years, Investigators Say http://huff.to/14OsZHV)”


I’m willing to bet that the reason they kept this seed around is that they were waiting for their “Protection Act” to finally get through. I wonder how many years they’d been lobbying to get that snuck into a bill?

Yes, I realize that this is speculation - but keep three things in mind:
1) That “Monsanto Protection Act” expires in September which means they knew they only had ONE growing season to unleash some sort of GMO related plan.
2) They claimed to have this seed destroyed at the beginning of 2012, yet enough of it to plant an entire field survived in Colorado and found it’s way to Oregon a year later.
3) Once the wheat is planted and is old enough to start pollinating other wheat, you can’t really get that genie back in the bottle. So what that means is that every crop that has been altered by this GMO pest plant, Monsanto can claim to have a patent for. I’m assuming that they’ll start suing farmers who inadvertently grow Monsanto’s franken-wheat.

They needed their “Monsanto Protection Act” in order to buffer any lawsuits they knew they’d inevitably face. 

Perhaps this wheat was the purpose of this act all along, I mean they kept the seeds viable for 7 years for some reason after all…

Filed under opinion monsanto wheat

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3 Things about the TPP you need to Know and Share | Acronym TV

1. It’s a secret. While parts of the TPP draft texts have been leaked, the Obama administration is brokering this deal behind closed doors & aggressively pursuing an agreement that, if the text were in fact shared publicly, the deal would be impossible to sign because that opposition to it would be so great. But who has time to sit down and parse through 24 chapters of legal babble, bicker and balderdash- that is what we have our elected officials in Congress for right?  Yes, well, about that- as Lori Wallach and Ben Beachey wrote in a New York Timed op ed on June 2nd: “While Congress has constitutional authority to set the terms of trade, so far the executive branch has managed to resist repeated requests by members of Congress to see the text of the draft agreement and has denied requests from members to attend negotiations as observers — reversing past practice.”

This is congress we are talking about- these gals and guys are by and large total yes men for corporate interests. If you can’t find allies in that group of swine, than what exactly are you selling here? A few days ago, after navigating a labyrinth of red tape- Congressman Alan Grayson was allowed to read the text of the agreement.

In a private room.

With no aides present and under the conditions that no notes could be taken or copies made and that the contents are classified top secret.

2. The TPP makes corporations more powerful than governments. Say that out loud to yourself and let it sink in: The TPP makes corporations more powerful than governments. As Kevin Zeese points out, that even though the public and the media can not see the texts, and select members of congress only get very limited access 600 corporations have been advising the president and suggesting amendments as they have full access to the documents.  This includes some of America’s worst corporate citizens: Monsanto, WalMart, Bank of America, JP Morgan, Pfizer and big Pharma, Cargill, Exxon-Mobil, Chevron among them. In other words, a corporate advisors to what Matt Taibbi famously called a great vampire squid wrapped around the face of humanity, relentlessly jamming its blood funnel into anything that smells like money gets to read and craft the text and you me and just about everyone we know, including our so called representative officials, are locked out.

3. The third thing you need to know about the TPP is the most important: we can stop it. Obama wants to fast track it through Congress this October. If you want to help stop the TPP, visit PopularResistance.org and sign up.

Filed under tpp monsanto Walmart bank of america jp morgan chase pfizer Cargill exxon-mobil

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Monsanto and Big Tobacco Blamed for Birth Defects

SOURCE

WILMINGTON, Del. (CN) - Monsanto, Philip Morris and other U.S. tobacco giants knowingly poisoned Argentinean tobacco farmers with pesticides, causing “devastating birth defects” in their children, dozens of workers claim in court.
     The farmers, on their own behalf and for their injured children, sued Altria Group fka Philip Morris Cos., Philip Morris USA, Carolina Leaf Tobacco, Universal Corporation fka Universal Leaf Tobacco Company, Monsanto, and their affiliates and Argentine subsidiaries, in New Castle County Court.
     The farmers grow tobacco on small family-owned farms in Misiones Province and sell it to U.S. tobacco distributors. Most of Argentina’s tobacco is grown in Misiones, a rural northeastern province.
     The farmers claim the tobacco companies asked them to use herbicides, pesticides and other toxic products made and distributed by Monsanto, and assured them the products were safe.
     They say the defendants “wrongfully caused the parental and infant plaintiffs to be exposed to those chemicals and substances which they both knew, or should have known, would cause the infant offspring of the parental plaintiffs to be born with devastating birth defects.”
     Birth defects cited in the 55-page complaint include cerebral palsy, psychomotor retardation, epilepsy, spina bifida, intellectual disabilities, metabolic disorders, congenital heart defects, Down syndrome, missing fingers and blindness.
     The farmers claim Philip Morris and Carolina Leaf used a tobacco brokerage company, Tabacos Norte, to buy tobacco from the farmers and sell them crop production supplies, including herbicides and pesticides.
     Tabacos Norte, based in Misiones, was created by Carolina Leaf and Philip Morris’ Argentine subsidiary in 1984, to produce tobacco fit for the North and South American markets, according to the complaint.
     The farmers say the tobacco companies that bought their crops asked them to replace the native tobacco with a new type, used in Philip Morris cigarettes, which required more pesticides.
     They say the defendants pushed for excessive use of pesticides and failed to warn them of the dangers or provide them with information or protective gear.
     Most farmers in Misiones used Roundup, a glyphosate-based herbicide made by Monsanto, to kill weeds and clear tobacco fields, according to the complaint.
     Monsanto and Philip Morris told them to use glyphosate frequently and in quantities beyond that necessary for effective weed control, the farmers say.

Read more …

Filed under News Monsanto Philip Morris Argentina Poison Corporation

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Monsanto Threatens to Sue Vermont if Legislators Pass a Bill Requiring GMO Food to Be Labeled

Side Note: An entity like Monsanto just should not exist… period.
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What it really comes down to this: Elected officials are abandoning the public interest and public will in the face of corporate intimidation

By Will Allen

The world’s most hated corporation is at it again, this time in Vermont.

Despite overwhelming public support and support from a clear majority of Vermont’s Agriculture Committee, Vermont legislators are dragging their feet on a proposed GMO labeling bill. Why? Because Monsanto has threatened to sue the state if the bill passes.

The popular legislative bill requiring mandatory labels on genetically engineered food (H-722) is languishing in the Vermont House Agriculture Committee, with only four weeks left until the legislature adjourns for the year. Despite thousands of emails and calls from constituents who overwhelmingly support mandatory labeling, despite the fact that a majority (6 to 5) of Agriculture Committee members support passage of the measure, Vermont legislators are holding up the labeling bill and refusing to take a vote.

Instead, they’re calling for more public hearings on April 12, in the apparent hope that they can run out the clock until the legislative session ends in early May.

What happened to the formerly staunch legislative champions of Vermont’s “right to know” bill? They lost their nerve and abandoned their principles after Monsanto representative recently threatened a public official that the biotech giant would sue Vermont if they dared to pass the bill. Several legislators have rather unconvincingly argued that the Vermont public has a “low appetite” for any bills, even very popular bills like this one, that might end up in court. Others expressed concern about Vermont being the first state to pass a mandatory GMO labeling bill and then having to “go it alone” against Monsanto in court.

What it really comes down to this: Elected officials are abandoning the public interest and public will in the face of corporate intimidation. 

Read more …

Filed under News Commentary GMO Frankenfoods Monsanto Vermont Washington DC

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